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Abstract

A bacterium, designated strain CM134L-2, was isolated from a chitin-enriched wheat leaf microbiome in Chengdu, Sichuan province, China. It was Gram-stain-negative, strictly aerobic, non-spore-forming, motile, rod-shaped, and bright yellow in colour. Strain CM134L-2 grew at 4–35 °C, at pH 6.0–9.0 and could use chitin as the only carbon resource. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain CM134L-2 was most closely related to Pedobacter nanyangensis Q-4 (97.7 %) and Pedobacter zeaxanthinifaciens TDMA-5 (97.4 %). Digital DNA–DNA hybridization (dDDH) values between strain CM134L-2 with these two type strains were 26.8  and 20.8 %, respectively, and average nucleotide identity (ANI) values were 83.2 and 76.2 %; these values are lower than the proposed and generally accepted species boundaries of 70 % for dDDH and 95–96 % for ANI, which suggests strain CM134L-2 represents a novel species. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain CM134L-2 was 39.3 mol%, menaquinone-7 was the major respiratory quinone, phosphatidylethanolamine was the major polar lipid and the major components of the cellular fatty acids were iso-C15 : 0, and C16 : 1ω7c/C16 : 1ω6c (summed feature 3); these features supported the affiliation of strain CM134L-2 to the genus Pedobacter . Overall, strain CM134L-2 belongs to the genus Pedobacter , but can be classified as a novel species, for which the name Pedobacter chitinilyticus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is CM134L-2 (=CGMCC 1.16520=KCTC 62643).

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2018-10-11
2020-01-26
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