1887

Abstract

A Gram-positive, strictly aerobic, non-motile, milky-white to creamy coloured and rod-shaped bacterium, designated BS05, was isolated from compost. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequence comparison revealed that the strain formed a distinct lineage within the genus Brevibacterium and was most closely related to Brevibacterium avium NCFB 3055 (96.3 %), Brevibacterium oceani BBH7 (96.2 %) and Brevibacterium epidermidis NBRC 14811 (96.1 %). The DNA G+C content was 62.3 mol%. The predominant quinone was MK-8(H2). The major fatty acids were anteiso-C15 : 0, anteiso-C17 : 0, iso-C16 : 0 and iso-C15 : 0. The cell-wall peptidoglycan of strain BS05 contained meso-diaminopimelic acid. The major polar lipid was phosphatidylglycerol. Moreover, the low sequence similarity of the 16S rRNA gene sequencing, physiological, biochemical and chemotaxonomic analyses allowed the phenotypic and genotypic differentiation of strain BS05 from the recognized species of the genus Brevibacterium . Therefore, strain BS05 represents a novel species of the genus Brevibacterium , for which the name Brevibacterium hankyongi sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain BS05 (=KACC 18875=LMG 29562).

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2018-07-31
2019-12-13
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