1887

Abstract

A bacterial isolate, designated G-5-5, was isolated from forest soil at Kyonggi University. Strain G-5-5 was acid-tolerant and alkali-tolerant. Cells were strictly aerobic, Gram-stain-negative, catalase- and oxidase-positive, non-motile, non-spore-forming, rod-shaped, and yellow-coloured. Strain G-5-5 hydrolysed DNA and tyrosine; assimilated d-glucose, maltose, N-acetyl-glucosamine and l-fucose; and tolerated only 0.5 % NaCl (w/v). Phylogenetic analysis based on its 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain G-5-5 formed a lineage within the family Rhodanobacteraceae and that it grouped with but was distinct from various members of the genus Rhodanobacter . The closest member was Rhodanobacter umsongensis GR24-2 (97.8 % sequence similarity). The sole respiratory quinone was Q-8. The major polar lipids of strain G-5-5 were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidyl-N-methylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and diphosphatidylglycerol. The major cellular fatty acids were summed feature 9 (iso-C17 : 1ω9c and/or C16 : 0 10-methyl), iso-C15 : 0, iso-C17 : 0, iso-C16 : 0 and anteiso-C15 : 0. The DNA G+C content of strain G-5-5 was 64.1 mol%. DNA–DNA hybridization relatedness between strain G-5-5 and other close members of the genus Rhodanobacter ranged from 19 % to 45 %. On the basis of the polyphasic characterization and phylogenetic analyses, strain G-5-5 represents a novel species of the genus Rhodanobacter , for which the name Rhodanobacter hydrolyticus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is G-5-5 (=KEMB 9005-533=KACC 19113=NBRC 112685).

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2018-06-28
2019-10-18
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