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Abstract

Among non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), the Mycobacterium simiae complex is one of the largest groups, consisting of 18 species of slow-growing mycobacteria. In 2009, a case of NTM-associated infectious skin disease was reported in Shiga Prefecture, Japan. The patient presented with scattered nodules on the chest, back and extremities, and an M. simiae -like organism was isolated from skin biopsy specimens obtained from one of these lesions. Based on several assessments, including multiple-gene analyses, biochemical characterization and drug susceptibility testing, we concluded that this isolate represented a novel species of NTM, and proposed the name ‘ Mycobacterium shigaense’. Since 2009, five more cases of NTM-associated infectious disease in which there was a suspected involvement of ‘M. shigaense’ have been reported. Interestingly, four of these six cases occurred in Shiga Prefecture. Here we performed multiple-gene phylogenetic analyses, physiological and biochemical characterization tests, drug susceptibility tests, and profiling of proteins, fatty acids and mycolic acids of eight clinical isolates from the six suspected ‘M. shigaense’ cases. The results confirmed that all of the clinical isolates were ‘M. shigaense’, a slow-growing, scotochromogenic species. Here M. shigaense is validly proposed as a new member of the M. simiae complex, with the type strain being UN-152 (=JCM 32072=DSM 46748).

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2018-06-25
2020-01-21
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