1887

Abstract

A novel bacterium, designated R14M6, was isolated from deep-sea sediment collected from the Ross Sea, Antarctica. Cells are Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, pale yellow, short-rod-shaped, polar-flagellated and aggregate-forming. Growth occurs at 4–36 °C, pH 6.0–8.3, and in 1–15 % (w/v) NaCl. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain R14M6 clustered together with Aurantimonas endophytica EGI6500337 and fell within the genus Aurantimonas . The 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain R14M6 shared similarity with A. endophytica EGI6500337 (99.15 %), A. manganoxydans DSM 21871 (97.73 %), A. coralicida DSM 14790 (97.58 %) and ‘ A. litoralis ’ KCTC 12094 (97.51 %). The DNA–DNA relatedness values between strain R14M6 and A. endophytica EGI6500337, A. coralicida DSM 14790, A. manganoxydans DSM 21871 and ‘ A. litoralis ’ KCTC 12094 were 36.9±4.5, 27.6±2.8, 29.6±1.2 and 25.2±2.4 % respectively. The major fatty acid of strain R14M6 was C18 : 1 ω7c. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylcholine, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and an unidentified aminolipid. Strain R14M6 contained Q-10 as the dominant isoprenoid quinone. The DNA G+C content of strain R14M6 was 67.4 mol%. Based on the phylogenetic, physiological and chemotaxonomic analyses, strain R14M6 represents a novel species of the genus Aurantimonas , for which the name Aurantimonas aggregata sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is R14M6 (=GDMCC 1.1202=KCTC 52919).

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2017-10-16
2019-10-22
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