1887

Abstract

This study describes three novel xylose-assimilating yeasts, which were isolated from decayed wood collected from Bung Hatta Botanical Garden in West Sumatra and Cibodas Botanic Garden in West Java, or from litter from Eka Karya Bali Botanic Garden in Bali, Indonesia. Phylogenetic analysis was performed based on the sequences of the D1/D2 domains of the large ribosomal subunit (LSU), the small ribosomal subunit (SSU), the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and elongation factor-1α (EF-1α), and the three strains were found to represent three novel species belonging to genera Barnettozyma or Wickerhamomyces. The morphological, biochemical and physiological characteristics indicated that the strains were distinct from other closely related species. Strains 13Y206 and 14Y196 belonging to the Barnettozyma clade are described as the type strains of Barnettozyma xylosiphila sp. nov. (type strain 13Y206=NBRC 110202=InaCC Y726; MycoBank MB808598) and Barnettozyma xylosica sp. nov. (type strain 14Y196=NBRC 111558=InaCC Y1030; MycoBank MB819485). Strain 14Y125 belonging to the Wickerhamomyces clade is described as the type strain of Wickerhamomyces xylosivorus f.a., sp. nov. (type strain 14Y125=NBRC 111553=InaCC Y1026; MycoBank MB819484).

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2017-09-12
2019-12-07
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