1887

Abstract

Two Gram-staining-negative, rod-shaped, aerobic, marine bacteria, designated HME9321 and HME9359, were isolated from seawater and lagoon water samples in the Republic of Korea. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences of the two strains revealed that they belonged to the genus Lewinella within the family Saprospiraceae . The 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of strain HME9321 showed highest similarities with Lewinella aquimaris HDW-36 (95.2 %), Lewinella marina MKG-38 (94.7 %) and Lewinella xylanilytica 13–9-B8 (94.0 %). Strain HME9359 had highest sequence similarities with Lewinella agarilytica SST-19 (94.7 %), Lewinella persica T-3 (94.1 %) and Lewinella antarctica IMCC3223 (93.3 %). The predominant fatty acids of strain HME9321 were summed feature 3 (comprising C16 : 1 ω7c and/or C16 : 1 ω6c), iso-C15 : 0 and summed feature 9 (comprising iso-C16 : 0 10-methyl and/or C17 : 1 ω9c) while those of strain HME9359 were summed feature 3 (comprising C16 : 1 ω7c and/or C16 : 1 ω6c) and iso-C15 : 0. The major isoprenoid quinone of both strains was MK-7. Strain HME9321 contained the polar lipids, phosphatidylethanolamine, one unidentified aminolipid, one unidentified phospholipid and nine unidentified polar lipids, while strain HME9359 contained phosphatidylethanolamine, one unidentified phospholipid and nine unidentified polar lipids. The DNA G+C contents of strains HME9321 and HME9359 were 58.7 and 62.0 mol%, respectively. Based on the results of the phenotypic, genotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic investigation, two novel species, Lewinella maritima sp. nov. and Lewinella lacunae sp. nov. are proposed. The type strains are HME9321 (=KACC 17619=CECT 8419) and HME9359 (=KCTC 42187=CECT 8679), respectively.

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2017-09-06
2019-08-24
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