1887

Abstract

A Gram-reaction-negative, aerobic, oxidase- and catalase-positive, yellow-pigmented, non-flagellated, rod-shaped bacterium, designed strain SM1501, was isolated from surface seawater of the South China Sea. SM1501 grew at 7–42 °C and with 0–11 % (w/v) NaCl. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that SM1501 represented a member of the genus , sharing the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity (97.4 %) with and 94.2–96.5 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities to other species of the genus with validly published names. The average nucleotide identity (ANI) value and DNA–DNA hybridization value between SM1501 and were only 74.6 and 20.0 %, respectively. The predominant cellular fatty acids of SM1501 were Cω6, Cω7 and summed feature 3 (Cω7 and/or iso-C 2-OH). The major polar lipids of the strain were phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, sphingoglycolipid, diphosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylcholine and the main respiratory quinone of was Q-10. Polyphasic data presented in this paper support the notion that SM1501 represents a novel species in the genus , for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of is SM1501 (=KCTC 42669=CCTCC AB 2015396).

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2017-07-01
2019-12-13
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