1887

Abstract

Obligately anaerobic, Gram-stain-positive, spore-forming bacteria indistinguishable by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis were isolated from non-dairy protein shakes in bloated bottles. One of the isolates, strain IEH 97212, was selected for further study. The strain was closely related to and Group 1 based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities. Phylogenetic analysis also showed that strain IEH 97212 and strain PE (=DSM 18688), a bacterium isolated from solfataric mud, had identical 16S rRNA gene sequences. Strains IEH 97 212 and DSM 18 688 were relatively more thermophilic (temperature range for growth: 30–55 °C) and less halotolerant [growth range: 0–2.5 % (w/v) NaCl] than and They were negative for catalase, oxidase, urease and -pyrrolidonyl-arylamidase and did not produce indole. The strains produced acid from -glucose, maltose and trehalose, and hydrolysed gelatin, but did not hydrolyse aesculin. The end-products of growth included acetic acid, propionic acid, butyric acid, isobutyric acid, valeric acid, isovaleric acid, isocaproic acid, phenylpropionic acid, 2-piperidinone, 2-pyrrolidinone and gas(es). The predominant fatty acids were C, C and Cω9. The genomic DNA G+C content of strains IEH 97212 and DSM 18688 was 26.9 and 26.7 mol%, respectively. According to the digital DNA–DNA hybridization data, the relatedness of these strains was 98.4 %, while they showed only 35.7–36.0 % relatedness to . Based on the results of this polyphasic study, these strains represent a novel species, for which the name sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain IEH 97212 (=NRRL B-65463=DSM 104389).

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2017-07-01
2019-12-15
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