1887

Abstract

The taxonomic position of two isolates belonging to the genus was determined. The first isolate, R-53603, was obtained from purulent discharge from the toe of a cellulitis patient in Kuwait. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed 99.87 % similarity of R-53603 with environmental isolate P031 (=R-53745) originating from activated sludge in Singapore. The two isolates were phylogenetically positioned on the same sub-branch. Highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity was found with the type strains of (98.23 %), (97.78 %) and (97.14 %). DNA–DNA hybridizations revealed <70 % relatedness between the two isolates and the type strains of the close phylogenetic neighbours (18.0–24.5 %), (20.3–25.9 %) and (13.2–20.0 %). The high relative contribution of iso-C, iso-C 3-OH and summed feature 3 (iso-C 2-OH and/or Cω7) in the cellular fatty acid profiles of R-53603 and R-53745, the presence of sphingophospholipids, MK-7 as the dominant menaquinone and phosphatidylethanolamine as the major polar lipid in strain R-53603 are typical chemotaxonomic characteristics for members of the genus . Phenotypic features most useful for differentiation of the two novel strains from the most closely related species include growth on MacConkey agar, and utilization of stachyose, guanidine HCl and lithium chloride in Biolog GEN III tests. Strains R-53603 and R-53745 thus represent a novel species, for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is R-53603 (=LMG 28764=DSM 102028).

Keyword(s): cellulitis , sludge and Sphingobacterium
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2017-05-01
2020-01-21
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