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Abstract

Strain FC2004, a strictly anaerobic, extremely thermophilic heterotroph, was isolated from a hot spring in Thailand. Typical cells of strain FC2004 were rod shaped (0.5–0.6×1.1–2.5 µm) with an outer membrane swelling out over an end. Filaments (10–30 µm long) and membrane-bound spheroids containing two or more cells inside (3–8 µm in diameter) were observed. The temperature range for growth was 60–88°C (optimum 78–80°C), pH range was 6.5–8.5 (optimum pH 7.5) and NaCl concentration range was 0 to <5 g l (optimum 0.5 g l). S stimulated growth yield. SO and NO did not influence growth. Glucose, maltose, sucrose, fructose, cellobiose, CM-cellulose and starch were utilized for growth. The membrane was composed mainly of the saturated fatty acids C and C. The DNA G+C content was 45.8 mol%. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of strain FC2004 revealed highest similarity to species of the genus : DSM 9078 (97–96 %), AW-1 (96 %), CBS-1 (96 %), H21 (95 %), Rt17-B1 (95 %), 1445t (95 %) and AB39 (93 %). Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences and average nucleotide identity analysis suggested that strain FC2004 represented a novel species within the genus , for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is FC2004 (=JCM 18757=ATCC BAA-2483).

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2016-12-01
2022-01-20
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