1887

Abstract

A novel, Gram-stain-negative, facultatively anaerobic, halophilic bacterium, designated strain Q1U, was isolated from a sediment sample collected from Qinghai Lake, PR China. The cells of the strain were short rod-shaped (0.2–0.3×0.6–2.5 µm) and non-motile. Strain Q1U formed yellowish colonies and grew at temperatures of 2–37 °C (optimum 30–33 °C), at pH 6.0–9.0 (optimum pH 7.0) and in the presence of 0–20 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum 7.5 %). The major cellular fatty acids were Cω7 (58.6 %), Cω7 and/or Cω6 (14.8 %) and C (10.1 %). The polar lipids were identified as diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, unknown phospholipid and unknown lipids. The genomic DNA G+C content was 61.5 mol%, and the predominant respiratory ubiquinone Q-9. Based on phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences and concatenated 16S rRNA, and gene sequences, the isolate was found to belong to the genus in the class The most closely related species were DSM 4743 (98.3 % 16S rRNA sequence similarity), DSM 25870 (98.2 %) and DSM 15725 (98.2 %). DNA–DNA relatedness values between strain Q1U and the type strains of eight other species of the genus ranged from 21.3 % to 10.1 %. On the basis of phenotypic, phylogenetic and chemotaxonomic analyses, and DNA–DNA hybridization relatedness values, strain Q1U is considered to represent a novel species of the genus ; the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is Q1U (=CGMCC 1.15122=KCTC 42517).

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2016-11-01
2022-01-21
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