1887

Abstract

A Gram-stain-negative, strictly aerobic, non-motile, light yellow, short-rod bacterium (designated GJ30-7) isolated from compost, was characterized using a polyphasic approach, in order to clarify its taxonomic position. Strain GJ30-7 was observed to grow optimally at 30 °C and at pH 7.0 on R2A agar medium. Strain Gsoil GJ30-7 possessed β-glucosidase activity, which was responsible for its ability to transform ginsenosides Rb1 and Rc (the two main active components of ginseng) to ginsenoside F2. Phylogenetic analysis, based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities, indicated that GJ30-7 belongs to the genus of the family and was most closely related to JCM 30166 (92.6 %), KACC 18188 (92.6 %), and KCTC 23708 (92.0 %). The DNA G+C content was 43 mol% and MK-7 was the major isoprenoid quinone. The main polar lipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, one unidentified phospolipid and one unknown polar lipid. In contrast to standard and reference strains, unidentified sphingolipid was also present. The predominant fatty acids of strain GJ30-7 were iso-C, iso-C 3-OH, Cω7 and/or Cω6 (summed feature 3) and iso-Cω9 and/or C 10-methyl (summed feature 9), supporting the affiliation of strain GJ30-7 to the genus . However, strain GJ30-7 could be distinguished genotypically and phenotypically from species of the genus with validly published names. The novel isolate therefore represents a novel species, for which the name sp. nov. is proposed, with the type strain GJ30-7 (=KACC 18625=JCM 30948).

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2016-11-01
2021-06-23
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