1887

Abstract

A novel, orange-pigmented, halophilic archaeon, strain DC8, was isolated from Urmia salt lake in north-west Iran. The cells of strain DC8 were non-motile and pleomorphic, from small rods to triangular or disc shaped. The novel strain needed at least 2.5 M NaCl and 0.02 M MgCl for growth. Optimal growth was achieved at 4.0 M NaCl and 0.1 M MgCl. The optimum pH and temperature for growth were pH 7.5 and 45 °C, respectively, and it was able to grow over a pH range of 7.0 to 8.5 and a temperature range of 25 to 55 °C. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that strain DC8 was a member of the family ; however, its similarity was as low as 90.1 %, 89.3 % and 89.1 % to the most closely related haloarchaeal taxa, including type species of members of the genera , and , respectively. The G+C content of its DNA was 68.1 mol%. Polar lipid analyses revealed that strain DC8 contained phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol phosphate methyl ester, phosphatidylglycerol sulfate and phosphatidic acid. One unknown phospholipid, two major glycolipids and one minor glycolipid were also detected. The only quinone present was MK-8 (II-H). The physiological, biochemical and phylogenetic differences between strain DC8 and other extremely halophilic archaeal genera with validly published names supported that this strain represents a novel species of a new genus within the family , for which the name gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is strain DC8 ( = IBRC-M 10911 = CECT 8793).

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2016-02-01
2020-01-19
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