1887

Abstract

Two bacterial strains (FA1 and FA2) were isolated from the phyllosphere of a leguminous tree, , in central Argentina. The strains were Gram-negative, strictly aerobic, rod-shaped, motile and formed yellow-pigmented colonies on nutrient agar. The two-primer RAPD patterns of the two strains were identical, suggesting that they belong to the same species. The complete 16S rRNA gene sequences of the two strains were obtained and comparisons demonstrated that they cluster phylogenetically with the species of the genus . Strain FA2 was most closely related (97·6 %) to . 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities to all other established species ranged from 94·4 % (to ) to 97·6 % (to ). Strains FA1 and FA2 were catalase-positive and oxidase-negative. Aesculin was hydrolysed, gelatin and urea were not. -Galactosidase was produced. From 51 compounds tested 21 were used as single sources of carbon. The major respiratory lipoquinone was ubiquinone-10. The predominant cellular fatty acids were 16 : 0, 18 : 17 and 16 : 17 (from summed feature 3). Hydroxy fatty acids 14 : 0 2-OH and 15 : 0 iso 2-OH were present as well (from summed feature 4). The polar lipids detected in strain FA2 were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, sphingoglycolipid and two unidentified phospholipids. The DNA G+C content of strain FA2 was 61 mol%. DNA–DNA hybridization experiments showed 27·6 % relatedness between strain FA2 and DSM 7418. Based upon phenotypic and molecular evidence, a novel species of the genus is proposed, sp. nov., with strain FA2 (=LMG 21958=CECT 5832) as the type strain.

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2004-11-01
2019-10-22
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Two-primer RAPD patterns of strains FA1 (land 2) and FA2 (lane 3) isolated from the phyllosphere in comparison with that of LMG 10922 (lane 1). Lane MW, standard VI (Boehringer-Roche).

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Dendrogram based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showing the phylogenetic position of sp. nov. FA2 within the genus . Nucleotide substitution rates were determined using the CLUSTAL X method and the neighbour-joining method was used to construct the phylogenetic tree. Alignment gaps and unidentified base positions were excluded from the analysis, which was based on 1440 nucleotides. Bootstrap values (1000 replicates) are shown as percentages at each node if 55 % or greater Bar, 1 nt substitution per 100 nt. was used as the outgroup. [PDF](15 KB)

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Two-dimensional TLC of polar lipids of strain FA2 . Abbreviations: DPG, diphosphatidylglycerol; PC, phosphatidylcholine; PE, phosphatidylethanolamine; PG, phosphatidylglycerol; PL1, PL2, unidentified phospholipids; SPG, sphingoglycolipid.

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