1887

Abstract

Three chitin-degrading strains representing two novel species were isolated from mangrove forests in Okinawa, Japan. The isolates, ABABA23, ABABA211 and ABABA212, were Gram-negative, non-spore-forming, strictly aerobic chemo-organotrophs. The novel strains produced Q-8 as the major isoprenoid quinone component. The predominant fatty acids were iso-C and C. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the isolates were closely affiliated with members of the genus . The DNA G+C contents of strains ABABA23 and ABABA212 were 57.8 and 60.2 mol%, respectively. DNA–DNA relatedness values between these two strains and reference strains were significantly lower than 70 %, the generally accepted threshold level below which strains are considered to belong to separate species. Based on differences in taxonomic characteristics, the three isolates represent two novel species of the genus , for which the names sp. nov. (type strain, ABABA212 = JCM 16148 = NCIMB 14577) and sp. nov. (type strain, ABABA23 = JCM 16147 = NCIMB 14576; reference strain, ABABA211) are proposed.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • KAKENHI (Award 20580092)
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2011-09-01
2021-08-05
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