1887

Abstract

The taxonomic status of 64 strains of whorl-forming (formerly ) species was re-evaluated and strains were reclassified on the basis of their phenotypes, DNA–DNA hybridization data and partial sequences of , the structural gene of the B subunit of DNA gyrase. These strains, which consisted of 46 species and eight subspecies with validly published names and 13 species whose names have not been validly published [including 10 strains examined by the International Project (ISP)], were divided into two groups, namely typical and atypical whorl-forming species, based on their phenotypes and gene sequences. The typical whorl-forming species (59 strains) were divided into six major clusters of three or more species, seven minor clusters of two species and five single-member clusters, based on the threshold value of 97 % sequence similarity. Major clusters were typified by , , , , and . Phenotypically, members of each cluster resembled each other closely except for the cluster, which was divided phenotypically into the and subclusters, and the cluster, which was divided into the and subclusters. Strains in each minor cluster closely resembled each other phenotypically. DNA–DNA relatedness between the representative species and others in each major cluster and/or subcluster, and between strains in the minor clusters, was >70 %, indicating that the major clusters and/or subclusters and the minor clusters each comprise a single species. It was concluded that 59 strains of typical whorl-forming species consisted of the following 18 species, including subjective synonym(s): , , , , , , , , ‘’, , , , , , , , and .

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2003-09-01
2019-10-22
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