1887

Abstract

This study characterized strain WP01, a Gram-staining-negative, rod-shaped, aerobic bacterium isolated from a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated soil in New Zealand. Strain WP01 shared many characteristics of the genus : the predominant respiratory quinone (89 %) was ubiquinone with ten isoprene units (Q-10); the major fatty acids were C 7, C 7, C and C 2-OH; spermidine was the major polyamine; the DNA G+C content was 63.8 mol%; and the -specific 16S rRNA signatures were conserved. A point of difference from other species of the genus was that strain WP01 reduced nitrate to nitrite. The polar lipid pattern consisted of the predominant compounds diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and sphingoglycolipids. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that, amongst the recognized species of the genus , strain WP01 was most similar to GIFU 9882 and YT (>97 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities). The low DNA–DNA relatedness values between strain WP01 and GIFU 9882 (46.6 %) and DSM 16289 (25.6 %) indicated no relatedness at the species level. On the basis of these characteristics, it is concluded that strain WP01 should be considered as representing a novel species within the genus , for which the name sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is WP01 (=DSM 19371=ICMP 13533).

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2010-02-01
2019-10-21
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