1887

Abstract

An isolate of a Gram-positive bacterium, designated strain Ben 106, was obtained in pure culture by micromanipulation of a biomass sample obtained from a laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactor. This isolate grew axenically as cocci or clusters of cocci arranged in regular tetrads and was morphologically similar to the dominant organism observed in the biomass. This morphology resembled that of some Gram-positive and -negative bacteria and the so-called 'G-bacteria' commonly seen in activated sludge samples. Strain Ben 106 is a non-motile, facultative anaerobe. It is oxidase-negative, catalase-positive and is capable of reducing nitrate. This organism can grow between 20 and 37 °C, with an optimum temperature of 25 °C. The pH range for growth is between 6·0 and 9·0, with an optimum pH of 7·5. The isolate stained positively for intracellular polyphosphate granules. The diagnostic diamino acid of the peptidoglycan is -diaminopimelic acid (-Apm) with a glycine moiety at position 1 of the peptide subunit, which characterizes the presence of a rare peptidoglycan (type A3-′). Two menaquinones, MK-9(H) and MK-7(H), are present and the main cellular fatty acid is 12-methyltetradecanoic acid. The G+C content is 74 mol%. From phenotypic characteristics and 16S rDNA sequence analysis, the isolate differed sufficiently from its closest phylogenetic relatives, namely , , , and in the A1 subdivision of the Gram-positive bacteria (i.e. with a high G+C content), suborder , to be placed in a new genus, , as gen. nov., sp. nov. The type strain is Ben 106 (= ACM 5119).

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1999-04-01
2024-05-21
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