1887

Abstract

An anaerobic, extremely thermophilic xylanolytic, non-spore-forming bacterium was isolated from a sediment sample taken from Owens Lake, California, and designated strain OL (T = type strain). Strain OL had a Gram-negative reaction and occurred as short rods which sometimes formed long chains containing a few coccoid cells. It grew at 50--80 °C, with an optimum at 75 °C. The pH range for growth was 5·5--9·0 with an optimum at about pH 7·5. When grown on glucose at optimal conditions, its doubling time was 7·3 h. In addition to glucose, the isolate utilized sucrose, xylose, fructose, ribose, xylan, starch, pectin and cellulose. Yeast extract stimulated growth on carbohydrates but was not obligately required. The end products from glucose fermentation were lactate, acetate, ethanol, H and CO. The G+C content of strain OL was 36·6 mol%. The 16S rDNA sequence analysis indicated that strain OL was a member of the subdivision containing Gram-positive bacteria with DNA G+C content of less than 55 mol% and clustered with members of the genus . Because strain OL is phylogenetically and phenotypically different from other members of this genus, it is proposed to designate this isolate sp. nov. Strain OL is the type strain (=ATCC700167).

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1998-01-01
2023-02-06
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