1887

Abstract

Strains of sp. nov. and strains of sp. nov. were isolated from the hot spring at Vizela in northern Portugal and the hot spring at Alcafache in central Portugal, respectively. The strains of produce orange-red-pigmented colonies and have an optimum growth temperature of about 55°C, while the strains of produce yellow-pigmented colonies and have an optimum growth temperature of about 50°C. The strains of both species are catalase negative. These species can be distinguished from each other and from by biochemical characteristics, fatty acid composition data, and 16S rRNA gene sequence data. Our phylogenetic analysis showed that strains VI-R2 (T = type strain) and ALT-8 belong to the line of descent. The type strain of is strain VI-R2 (= DSM 9946), and the type strain of is strain ALT-8 (= DSM 9957).

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1995-10-01
2022-08-10
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