1887

Abstract

A new species, , is proposed for pigmented, asaccharolytic strains that were isolated from the gingival margins or mouth-associated diseases of cats. This bacterium is an obligately anaerobic, gram-negative, brown- or black-pigmented, asaccharolytic, nonmotile, nonsporing, rod-shaped organism which does not grow in bile and has a guanine-plus-cytosine content of 40 to 42 mol%. It produces major amounts of acetic, butyric, and isovaleric acids and minor amounts of propionic, isobutyric, and phenylacetic acids as end products of metabolism in cooked meat medium. Glutamate and malate dehydrogenases are present, while 6-phosphogluconate and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenases are absent. The major cellular fatty acid is 13-methyltetradecanoic acid (iso-C acid). strains are catalase positive and produce ammonia, and colonies fluoresce under short-wavelength UV light. These strains do not hemagglutinate erythrocytes, exhibit trypsinlike activity, or produce chymotrypsin or α-fucosidase. They are heavily piliated and produce a capsule. The type strain is strain VPB 3329 (= NCTC 12469). (D. N. Love, J. L. Johnson, R. F. Jones, and A. Calverley, Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 37:307-309, 1987) is an obligately anaerobic, gram-negative, pigmented, asaccharolytic, nonmotile, rod-shaped organism which does not grow in bile and has a guanine-plus-cytosine content of 42 to 44 mol%. This organism produces major amounts of acetic, butyric, and phenylacetic acids and minor amounts of isobutyric and isovaleric acids as end products of metabolism in cooked meat medium. has been shown to contain 13-methyltetradecanoic acid (iso-C acid) as its major cellular fatty acid and to have glutamate and malate dehydrogenases, while 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase are absent. Nomenclature changes published in 1988 (H. N. Shah and M. D. Collins, Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 38:128-131, 1988) for the asaccharolytic, pigmented, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria require reassignment of this organism to the genus as comb. nov.

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1992-07-01
2022-05-21
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