1887

Abstract

Partial 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid sequences were determined for subsp. subsp. , and . These sequences were compared with previously published sequences of sp., , and , and percentages of homology were calculated. With the exception of , all of the campylobacters formed a tight phylogenetic cluster. Within this cluster were the following organisms that have been classified as species of and , and . The average level of interspecies homology within this group was 94.4%. and formed a second cluster with a level of interspecies homology of 90.4%. The average level of homology of the cluster with species of the campylobacter cluster was 85.1%. sp. was only 83% homologous with either of the two clusters. Based upon the sequence data, we suggest that all members of the campylobacter cluster should be placed in the genus . However, formal resolution of the taxonomic status of the campylobacter cluster may require additional information provided by other experimental methods.

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1988-01-01
2024-02-20
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