1887

Abstract

A group of -like organisms which do not deposit sulfur from sulfide but which were isolated from the same locations as sulfide-oxidizing beggiatoas should be considered as a species within the genus These organisms fit the general description of as originally described by E. G. Pringsheim, and strain B23SS (= ATCC 43189) is herein designated as the neotype strain. The guanine-plus-cytosine content of the deoxyribonucleic acid of strain B23SS was 42 mol%. A few strains that were formerly considered as spp. have been shown to lack the ability to accumulate sulfur in inclusions when exposed to hydrogen sulfide. Because rigorous tests were not previously carried out to determine whether these organisms really deposited sulfur, it is probable that they were never capable of doing so. These strains, which form a distinct group of microorganisms, now should be considered to be a species. This group of organisms is most characteristic of the species as originally described by E. G. Pringsheim. Because strains had not been characterized since the original description, was not included in the Approved List of Bacterial Names. This name has, therefore, been revived, and strain L1401-2 (= ATCC 43190), a strain originally isolated by E. G. Pringsheim, is designated as the neotype strain. The guanine-plus-cytosine content of the deoxyribonucleic acid of these strains ranged from 59 to 63 mol%. These two groups of organisms are compared to , the best-characterized strain, and to , the best-characterized and type species of the genus

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1986-04-01
2022-12-07
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