1887

Abstract

Abstract

Several strains previously classified as group III staphylococci, by the scheme of Schleifer and Kocur, and numerous strains isolated from animal and human skin that appeared to be related to group III strains were subjected to a taxonomic study. As a result of this study, all group III and related strains were placed in the newly proposed species This species can be differentiated from all other staphylococci on the basis of colony morphology, cell wall peptidoglycan, acid production from cellobiose and usually from fucose under aerobic conditions, and a combination of other characteristics. Thirty-five strains that produced large colonies, usually moderate to light anaerobic growth in thioglycolate, and acid from galactose, sucrose, glycerol, and often from melezitose were placed in the type subspecies, subsp. Nine strains that produced very small, unpigmented colonies, usually no detectable anaerobic growth in thioglycolate, and acid from sucrose and often from galactose, glycerol, lactose, and raffinose were placed in the subspecies subsp. The type strains of these subspecies are ATCC 29062 and ATCC 29070, respectively. A group of three strains that produced relatively small, unpigmented colonies, moderate anaerobic growth in thioglycolate, and acid from glycerol but failed to produce acid from sucrose, melezitose, raffinose and usually galactose may also deserve subspecies status. A summary of the character variation found in and in other novobiocin-resistant species and a simplified scheme for distinguishing and its subspecies are included in this paper.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/00207713-26-1-22
1976-01-01
2024-06-19
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/ijsem/26/1/ijs-26-1-22.html?itemId=/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/00207713-26-1-22&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Archibald A. R., Baddiley J., Button D. 1968; The glycerol teichoic acid of walls of Staphylococcus lactis 13. Biochem. J 110:543–557
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Archibald A. R., Baddiley J., Heckels J. E., Heptinstall S. 1971; Further studies on the glycerol teichoic acid of walls of Staphylococcus lactis 13. Location of phosphodiester groups and their susceptibility to hydrolysis with alkali. Biochem. J 125:353–359
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Davison A. L. 1968; The characterizaton of a Micrococcus (Staphylococcus lactis) sp. 13 with an atypical teichoic acid in its cell wall. Biochem. J 110:557–558
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Kloos W. E., Schleifer K. H. 1975; Isolation and characterization of staphylococci from human skin. II. Descriptions of four new species: Staphylococcus warneri, Staphylococcus capitis, Staphylococcus hominis, and Staphylococcus simulans . Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol 25:62–79
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Kloos W. E., Schleifer K. H. 1975; Simplified scheme for routine identification of human Staphylococcus species. J. Clin. Microbiol 1:82–88
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Kloos W. E., Tornabene T. G., Schleifer K. H. 1974; Isolation and characterization of micrococci from human skin, including two new species: Micrococcus lylae and Micrococcus kristinae . Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol 24:79–101
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Kocur M., Boháček J. 1974; DNA base composition and the classification of non-pigmented micrococci. Microbios 10:31–38
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Kocur M., Martinec T. 1972; Taxonomic status of Micrococcus varians Migula 1900 and designation of the neotype strain. Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol 22:228–232
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Martley F. G., Jayashankar S. R., Lawrence R. C. 1970; An improved medium for the detection of proteolytic organisms in total bacterial counts. J. Appl. Bacteriol 33:363–370
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Schleifer K. H., Kandier O. 1967; Zur chemischen Zusammensetzung der Zellwand der Streptokokken. I. Die Aminosäuresequenz des Mureins von Streptococcus thermophilus und Streptococcus faecalis . Arch. Mikrobiol 57:335–364
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Schleifer K. H., Kandier O. 1972; The peptidoglycan types of bacterial cell walls and their taxonomic implications. Bacteriol. Rev 36:407–477
    [Google Scholar]
  12. Schleifer K. H., Kloos W. E. 1975; Isolation and characterization of staphylococci from human skin. I. Amended descriptions of Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphyococcus saprophyticus, and descriptions of three new species: Staphylococcus cohnii, Staphylococcus haemolyticus, and Staphylococcus xylosus . Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol 25:50–61
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Schleifer K. H., Kocur M. 1973; Classification of staphylococci based on chemical and biochemical properties. Arch. Mikrobiol 93:65–85
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Smith R. F., Bettge C. L. 1972; Comparative characteristics of human and porcine staphylococci and their differentiation in burn xenografting procedures. Appl. Microbiol 24:929–932
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Varadi D. P., Saqueton A. C. 1970; Perifollicular elastolysis. Br. J. Dermatol 83:143–150
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Wolin M. J., Archibald A. R., Baddiley J. 1966; Changes in wall teichoic acid resulting from mutations of Staphylococcus aureus . Nature (London) 209:484–486
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/00207713-26-1-22
Loading
/content/journal/ijsem/10.1099/00207713-26-1-22
Loading

Data & Media loading...

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error