1887

Abstract

A modified two-component regulatory system consisting of two response regulators, CorR and CorP, and the histidine protein kinase CorS, regulates the thermoresponsive production of the phytotoxin coronatine (COR) in PG4180. COR is produced at the virulence-promoting temperature of 18 °C, but not at 28 °C, the optimal growth temperature of PG4180. Assuming that the highly hydrophobic N-terminus of CorS might be involved in temperature-signal perception, the membrane topology of CorS was determined using translational and fusions, leading to a topological model for CorS with six transmembrane domains (TMDs). Interestingly, three PhoA fusions located downstream of the sixth TMD showed a thermoresponsive phenotype. Enzymic activity, immunoblot, and protease-sensitivity assays were performed to localize the CorS derivatives, to analyse the expression level of hybrid proteins and to examine the model. In-frame deletions of the last four, or all six TMDs gave rise to non-functional CorS. The results indicated that the transmembrane region is important for CorS to function as a temperature sensor, and that the membrane topology of CorS might be involved in signal perception.

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2004-08-01
2020-04-01
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