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Abstract

Arabinose is a major plant aldopentose in the form of arabinans complexed in cell wall polysaccharides or glycoproteins (AGP), but comparatively rare as a monosaccharide. -arabinose is an important bacterial metabolite, accessed by pectolytic micro-organisms such as via pectin and hemicellulose degrading enzymes. However, not all plant-associated microbes encode cell-wall-degrading enzymes, yet can metabolize -arabinose, raising questions about their use of and access to the glycan in plants. Therefore, we examined -arabinose metabolism in the food-borne pathogen O157:H7 (isolate Sakai) during its colonization of plants. -arabinose metabolism () and transport () genes were activated at 18 °C by -arabinose and expressed over prolonged periods . Although deletion of did not impact the colonization ability of O157:H7 (Sakai) on spinach and lettuce plants (both associated with STEC outbreaks), was induced on exposure to spinach cell-wall polysaccharides. Furthermore, debranched and arabinan oligosaccharides induced metabolism gene expression , and stimulated modest proliferation, while immobilized pectin did not. Thus, O157:H7 (Sakai) can utilize pectin/AGP-derived -arabinose as a metabolite. Furthermore, it differs fundamentally in gene organization, transport and regulation from the related pectinolytic species , reflective of distinct plant-associated lifestyles.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Leverhulme Trust (Award RPG-096)
    • Principle Award Recipient: NicolaJean Holden
  • University of Reading (Award PhD)
    • Principle Award Recipient: RobertWilson Jackson
  • Rural and Environment Science and Analytical Services Division (Award RD2.3.3)
    • Principle Award Recipient: NicolaJean Holden
  • Rural and Environment Science and Analytical Services Division (Award RD3.1.3)
    • Principle Award Recipient: NicolaJean Holden
  • This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.
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2021-07-28
2024-07-25
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