1887

Abstract

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a global health and economic crisis. With too few antibiotics in development to meet current and anticipated needs, there is a critical need for new therapies to treat Gram-negative infections. One potential approach is the use of living predatory bacteria, such as (small Gram-negative bacteria that naturally invade and kill Gram-negative pathogens of humans, animals and plants). Moving toward the use of as a ‘living antibiotic’ demands the investigation and characterization of these bacterial predators in biologically relevant systems. We review the fundamental science supporting the feasibility of predatory bacteria as alternatives to antibiotics.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Wellcome Trust (Award 209437/Z/17/Z)
    • Principle Award Recipient: NotApplicable
  • This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. This article was made open access via a Publish and Read agreement between the Microbiology Society and the corresponding author’s institution.
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2021-01-19
2021-09-28
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