1887

Abstract

Coral diseases contribute to the decline of coral reefs globally and threaten the health and future of coral reef communities. Acute Montipora white syndrome (aMWS) is a tissue loss disease that has led to the mortality of hundreds of Montipora capitata colonies in Kāne‘ohe Bay, Hawai‘i in recent years. This study describes the analysis of coral-associated bacterial communities using high-throughput sequencing generated by the PacBio RSII platform. Samples from three health states of M. capitata (healthy, healthy-diseased and diseased) were collected during an ongoing aMWS outbreak and a non-outbreak period and the bacterial communities were identified to determine whether a shift in community structure had occurred between the two periods. The bacterial communities associated with outbreak and non-outbreak samples were significantly different, and one major driver was a high abundance of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) identified as Escherichia spp. in the outbreak sequences. In silico bacterial source tracking suggested this OTU was likely from sewage contamination of livestock, rather than human, origin. The most abundant coliform OTU was a culturable E. fergusonii isolate, strain OCN300, however, it did not induce disease signs on healthy M. capitata colonies when used in laboratory infection trials. In addition, screening of the sequencing output found that the most abundant OTUs corresponded to previously described M. capitata pathogens. The synergistic combination of known coral pathogens, sewage contaminants and other stressors, such as fluctuating seawater temperatures and bacterial pathogens, have the potential to escalate the deterioration of coral reef ecosystems.

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2018-07-27
2021-10-20
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