1887

Abstract

SUMMARY: Bacteriophages, lytic for wild-type strains of and different from the phages that can be induced from these lysogenic cultures, were isolated from bottom sediments of an inland bay and its tributary river. The host ranges indicated seven phages, in three morphological groups: three were tailless phages, three had hexagonal head and sheathless flexible tail, and one had a sheathed tail. The hosts were restricted to non-proteolytic strains producing type B, E, or F toxin and to a few of the non-toxigenic clostridia which resemble type E. None of the phages was active on proteolytic producing type A, B, or F toxin or cultures producing type C or D toxin. The host ranges of the phages are considered to be part of the evidence that the types, as defined at present, based on the serological specificity of the toxins, obscure the natural relationships among the strains of the species.

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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-70-3-517
1972-05-01
2022-01-29
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