1887

Abstract

SUMMARY: Recently isolated virulent strains of grow well in a partially defined medium, but are more exacting in their growth requirements and conditions of growth than avirulent strains. The optimal pH for growth is 7·6–7·8. Mechanical agitation by stirring, spinning or aeration with either nitrogen or air, inhibits growth. Gaseous conditions, however, are critical in that there is an optimal relationship of surface area to volume of medium. Mechanical agitation and aeration stimulate the growth of avirulent strains.

Virulent strains require starch for growth, and there is a close relationship between virulence, specific agglutinability and starch requirement. Avirulent strains with low specific agglutinability grow readily in the absence of starch.

When starch in a standard medium is replaced by amylose, there is an increase in the final amount of growth. Amylopectin, glycogen and dextrans are about one-third as effective as starch; other carbohydrates, gums and inorganic adsorbents support little growth. Charcoal can replace starch, but has only 70% of its effect.

The amino-acid requirements of are satisfied by acid-hydrolysate of casein, the optimal concentration being 7%. All strains utilize aspartic and glutamic acids, serine, threonine, glycine, alanine and proline, but the rate of utilization is greater with virulent than with avirulent strains.

For good growth yeast extract is needed but can be replaced by nicotinamide, nicotinic acid or cozymase, provided sulphur-containing amino-acid is also present. Virulent strains of require a sulphur-containing acid for growth, which may be supplied by yeast extract. Cysteine, cystine or glutathione, but not methionine, act as sources of essential sulphur.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-4-3-345
1950-09-01
2021-10-26
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/micro/4/3/mic-4-3-345.html?itemId=/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-4-3-345&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

References

  1. Bordet J., Gengou O. 1906; Le microbe de la coqueluche. Ann. Inst. Pasteur 20:731
    [Google Scholar]
  2. Burnet F. M., Timmins C. 1937; Experimental infection. with Huemophilus pertussis in the mouse by intranasal infection. Brit. J. exp. Path 18:83
    [Google Scholar]
  3. Cohen S., Wheeler M. 1945; Pertussis vaccine prepared with Phase I culturesin fluid medium. Report of the DkMon of Laboratories and Research N.Y. State Department of Health p. 39.
    [Google Scholar]
  4. Consden R., Gordon A.H., Martin A.J.P. 1944; Partition chromatography with paper. Biochem. J 38:224
    [Google Scholar]
  5. Dent G.E. 1948; Partition chromatography with paper. Biochem. J 43:169
    [Google Scholar]
  6. Diemain W., Fresenius W. 1947; Chemical composition of yeasts. Dtsch. Lebensm. Rundsch 43:117
    [Google Scholar]
  7. Farrell L., Taylor E.M. 1945; Notes on the production of Phase I pertussis vaccine in fluid medium. Canad. J. publ.Hlth 36:826
    [Google Scholar]
  8. Fisher S. 1948; The behaviour of H. pertussis in casein hydrolysate broth. Aust. J. exp. Biol. med. Sci 24:299
    [Google Scholar]
  9. Haworth W.N., Peat S., Sagroth P.E. 1946; Amylose and amylopectin preparation. Nature Lond: 157:19
    [Google Scholar]
  10. Hehre E.J., Carlson A.S., Neill J.M. 1947; Production of starch-like material from glucose-1-phosphate by diphtheria bacilli. Science 106:523
    [Google Scholar]
  11. Hornibrook J.W. 1939; Cultivation of Phase I H. pertussis in a semi-synthetic liquid medium. Publ. Hlth Rep., Wash 54: (2) 847
    [Google Scholar]
  12. McLeod N. 1944; A simple and rapid method for the preservation of cultures by drying under vacuum. Inst. Med. Lab. Techn p. 92
    [Google Scholar]
  13. Pollock M.R. 1947; Growth of H. pertussis on medium without blood. Brit. J. exp. Path 28:295
    [Google Scholar]
  14. Pollock M.R. 1949; The effects of long-chain fatty acids on the growth of Haemophilus pertussis and other organisms. Symp. Soc. exp. Biol 3:193
    [Google Scholar]
  15. Pope C.G., Stevens M.F. 1937; The determination of amino-nitrogen using a copper method. Biochem. J 33:1070
    [Google Scholar]
  16. Schoch T.J., Williams C.B. 1944; Adsorption of fatty acid by the linear component of com starch. J. Amer. chem. Soc 66:1232
    [Google Scholar]
  17. Sumner J.B., Krishman P.S., Sisher EleanorB. 1947; An improved method for the preparation of co-enzyme I. Arch. Biochem 12:19
    [Google Scholar]
  18. Ungar J., Muggleton P.W. 1948; Aluminium phosphate as precipitant of agglutinable and non-agglutinable strains of. H. pertussis.Nature Lond.: 162:734
    [Google Scholar]
  19. Ungar J., Muggleton P.W. 1949; The relationship of the aluminium phosphate precipitation of organisms of Haemophilus pertussis strains to their other biological properties. J. gen. Microbiol 3:853
    [Google Scholar]
http://instance.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-4-3-345
Loading
/content/journal/micro/10.1099/00221287-4-3-345
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Most cited this month Most Cited RSS feed

This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error