1887

Abstract

JMP134(pJP4) is able to grow on minimal media containing the pollutants 3-chlorobenzoate (3-CB) or 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetate (2,4-D). genes from the 88 kb plasmid pJP4 encode enzymes involved in the degradation of these compounds. During growth of strain JMP134 in liquid medium containing 3-CB, a derivative strain harbouring a ∼∼95 kb plasmid was isolated. This derivative, designated JMP134(pJP4-F3), had an improved ability to grow on 3-CB, but had lost the ability to grow on 2,4-D. Sequence analysis of pJP4-F3 indicated that the plasmid had undergone a deletion of ∼∼16 kb, which included the intergenic region, spanning the gene to a previously unreported IS element. The loss of the gene explains the failure of the derivative to grow on 2,4-D. A ∼∼23 kb duplication of the region spanning - - --ISJP4-- - , giving rise to a 51-kb-long inverted repeat, was also observed. The increase in gene copy number for the () gene cluster may provide an explanation for the derivative strain’s improved growth on 3-CB. These observations are additional examples of the metabolic plasticity of JMP134, one of the more versatile pollutant-degrading bacteria.

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2001-08-01
2021-07-28
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