1887

Abstract

() was resistant to at least 7% (w/v) tannic acid and 4% (w/v) acacia condensed tannin, levels 10-fold greater than those tolerated by . Growth of in liquid medium was characterized by a lag period which increased, and a growth rate which decreased, with increasing tannin concentration. was also more tolerant to the presence of simple phenolic acid monomers than was , but the lag period was still concentration dependent. Gallate decarboxylase activity in was elevated in the presence of tannic acid or gallic acid but not with other phenolic acids. Scanning electron microscopic analysis showed that both the size and shape of and changed in response to tannin but only was surrounded by an extracellular polysaccharide matrix which accumulated in a tannin-concentration-dependent fashion. Washing of the cells to remove extracellular polysaccharide increased the lag period of in the presence of 1% (w/v) tannic acid from 4 h to 6 h. In contrast, increasing extracellular polysaccharide synthesis in did not increase its tolerance to tannic acid. These data demonstrate that has developed a number of mechanisms to reduce the potential effect of tannins on cell growth, and that these mechanisms provide the organism with a selective advantage over when grown in the presence of tannins.

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2001-04-01
2019-10-14
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