1887

Abstract

An organism able to utilize isonicotinate aerobically as the sole source of carbon, nitrogen and energy was isolated from soil samples and identified as a sp. No growth occurred on any other heteroaromatic substrate tested, except 2-hydroxyisonicotinate, which was shown to be an intermediate in isonicotinate metabolism. Degradation of isonicotinate involved two consecutive hydroxylations leading to 2,6-dihydroxy-isonicotinate (citrazinate). The reactions were catalysed by two different dehydrogenases, which were apparently molybdenum-dependent. Citrazinate was activated by CoA via a synthetase reaction, and the resulting citrazyl-CoA ester was reduced by a NADPH-dependent reductase. In the presence of 1 m-arsenite, cells accumulated 2-oxoglutarate during isonicotinate metabolism.

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1991-05-01
2021-04-17
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