1887

Abstract

During this global pandemic of the COVID-19 disease, a lot of information has arisen in the media and online without scientific validation, and among these is the possibility that this disease could be aggravated by a secondary bacterial infection such as as well as the interest or not in using azithromycin, a potentially active antimicrobial agent. The aim of this study was to carry out a systematic literature review, to prove or disprove these allegations by scientific arguments. The search included Medline, PubMed, and Pubtator Central databases for English-language articles published 1999–2021. After removing duplicates, a total of final eligible studies (=149) were selected. There were more articles showing an increase of abundance in the presence of viral infection like that related to Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), (HPV), and respiratory virus, highlighting differences according to methodologies and patient groups. The arguments for or against the use of azithromycin are stated in light of the results of the literature, showing the role of intercurrent factors, such as age, drug consumption, the presence of cancer or periodontal diseases. However, clinical trials are lacking to prove the direct link between the presence of spp. and a worsening of COVID-19, mainly those using azithromycin alone in this indication.

  • This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial License. The Microbiology Society waived the open access fees for this article.
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2022-05-05
2022-05-18
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