1887

Abstract

Bacterial dysentery is one of the greatest causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. spp. and diarrhoeagenic (DEC) are recognised as the most common causes of bacterial enteritis in developing countries including India.

Rapid and accurate identification of dysentery causing organisms using molecular methods is essential for better disease management, epidemiology and outbreak investigations.

In view of the limited information available on the dysentery causing agents like spp., enterohemorrhagic (EHEC)/enteropathogenic (EPEC) and enteroinvasive (EIEC)/ in India, this study was undertaken to investigate the presence of these pathogens in human and poultry stool samples by molecular methods.

In total, 400 human stool samples and 128 poultry samples were studied. Microaerophilic culture along with real-time multiplex PCR with the targets specific to the genus , , , EHEC, EPEC and EIEC/ was performed. Further species confirmation was done using MALDI-TOF MS.

On microaerophilic culture, was isolated in one human sample and two and one in poultry samples. On PCR analysis, among human stool samples, typical EPEC (42%) was predominantly seen followed by spp. (19%) and EIEC/ (10%). In contrast, spp. (41%) was predominant in poultry samples, followed by typical EPEC (26%) and EIEC/ (9%). Poly-infections with spp. and DEC were also observed among both sources.

The present study documented the increased prevalence of spp. in humans compared with the results of previous studies from India. Typical EPEC was found to be predominant in children less than 5 years of age in this study. The high prevalence of coinfections in the current study indicates that a multiple aetiology of diarrhoea is common in our settings.

Keyword(s): Campylobacter spp , dysentery , EIEC , EPEC and poultry
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/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/jmm.0.001478
2022-01-17
2024-07-20
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