1887

Abstract

. (Combretaceae) is commonly found in the Northeast Region of Brazil and is known for several bioactivities, including antimicrobial ones. Because of increasing bacterial antibiotic resistance, natural products from several plants have been studied as putative adjuvants to antibiotic activity, including products from

. This study was carried out to investigate the structural properties, bactericidal activity and antibiotic modifying action of the lupane triterpene 3β,6β,16β-trihydroxylup-20(29)-ene (CLF1) isolated from Mart. leaves.

. The CLF1 was evaluated by the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy method and the antibacterial activity of this compound was assayed alone and in association with antibiotics by microdilution assay.

. Spectroscopic studies confirmed the molecular structure of the CLF1 and permitted assignment of the main infrared bands of this natural product. Microbiological assays showed that this lupane triterpene possesses antibacterial action with clinical relevance against . The CLF1 triterpene increased antimicrobial activity against the multidrug-resistant 06 strain when associated with the antibiotics gentamicin and amikacin. Synergistic effects were observed against the 10 strain in the presence of the CLF1 triterpene with the antibiotic gentamicin.

. In conclusion, the CLF1 compound may be useful in the development of antibacterial drugs against the aforementioned bacteria.

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/content/journal/jmm/10.1099/jmm.0.001056
2019-10-01
2019-12-05
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