1887

Abstract

Summary

Interleukin-2 (IL-2)-activated lymphocytes interact directly with, and inhibit, the growth of hyphae. -stimulated natural killer (NK1.1) lymphocytes were demonstrated to secrete a soluble product capable of directly affecting yeast forms. Antibodies specific for interferon-γ completely eliminated the antifungal activity of the NK1.1 lymphocyte product and diminished the antifungal activity of NK1.1 lymphocytes against . Antibodies specific for other cytokines had no such effect. These data demonstrate that -stimulated NK1.1 lymphocytes have antifungal activity against yeast cells the release of interferon-γ. This antifungal activity was demonstrable only against the yeast form of the fungus, with no effect on hyphae.

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1998-11-01
2022-01-18
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