1887

Abstract

We investigated the impact of naturally occurring variation within the major (L1) and minor (L2) capsid proteins on the antigenicity of human papillomavirus (HPV) type 52 (HPV52). L1L2 pseudoviruses (PsVs) representing HPV52 lineage and sublineage variants A1, A2, B1, B2, C and D were created and tested against serum from naturally infected individuals, preclinical antisera raised against HPV52 A1 and D virus-like particles (VLPs) and neutralising monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) raised against HPV52 A1 VLP. HPV52 lineage D PsV displayed a median 3.1 (inter-quartile range 2.0–5.6) fold lower sensitivity to antibodies elicited following natural infection with, where data were available, HPV52 lineage A. HPV52 lineage variation had a greater impact on neutralisation sensitivity to pre-clinical antisera and MAbs. Chimeric HPV52 A1 and D PsV were created which identified variant residues in the FG (Q281K) and HI (K354T, S357D) loops as being primarily responsible for the reported differential sensitivities. Homology models of the HPV52 L1 pentamer were generated which permitted mapping these residues to a small cluster on the outer rim of the surface exposed pentameric L1 protein. These data contribute to our understanding of HPV L1 variant antigenicity and may have implications for seroprevalence or vaccine immunity studies based upon HPV52 antigens.

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2019-01-18
2019-09-18
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