1887

Abstract

Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is present in a state of latency in infected memory B-cells and EBV-associated lymphoid and epithelial cancers. Cell stimulation or differentiation of infected B-cells and epithelial cells induces reactivation to the lytic replication cycle. In each cell type, the EBV transcription and replication factor Zta (BZLF1, EB1) plays a role in mediating the lytic cycle of EBV. Zta is a transcription factor that interacts directly with Zta response elements (ZREs) within viral and cellular genomes. Here we undertake chromatin-precipitation coupled to DNA-sequencing (ChIP-Seq) of Zta-associated DNA from cancer-derived epithelial cells. The analysis identified over 14 000 Zta-binding sites in the cellular genome. We assessed the impact of lytic cycle reactivation on changes in gene expression for a panel of Zta-associated cellular genes. Finally, we compared the Zta-binding sites identified in this study with those previously identified in B-cells and reveal substantial conservation in genes associated with Zta-binding sites.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • University of Sussex (Award studentship)
    • Principle Award Recipient: AnjaK Godfrey
  • This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial License.
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2021-11-26
2022-01-29
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