1887

Abstract

Ethylene (ET), salicylic acid (SA) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) are important phytohormones regulating plant growth and development, as well as plant-microbe interactions. Plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) naturally associate with plants and facilitate plant growth through a variety of mechanisms, including the ability to modulate the concentrations of these phytohormones . Importantly, the wide presence of phytohormone degradation mechanisms amongst symbiotic and other soil- and plant-associated bacteria indicates that the ability to modulate phytohormone concentrations plays an important role in bacterial colonization and plant-growth promotion abilities. Obtaining phytohormone-degrading bacteria is therefore key for the development of novel solutions aiming to increase plant growth and protection. In this paper, we report an optimized targeted methodology and the consequent isolation of novel soil- and plant-associated bacteria, including rhizospheric, endophytic and phyllospheric strains, with the ability to degrade the phytohormones, SA and IAA, as well as the ET precursor, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC). By using an optimized targeted methodology, we rapidly isolated diverse soil- and plant-associated bacteria presenting phytohormone-degrading abilities from several plants, plant tissues and environments, without the need for prior extensive and laborious isolation and maintenance of large numbers of isolates. The developed methodology facilitates PGPB research, especially in developing countries. Here, we also report, for the first time, the isolation of bacterial strains able to concomitantly catabolize three phytohormones (SA, IAA and ACC). Ultimately, the described targeted methodology and the novel phytohormone-degrading bacteria obtained in this work may be useful tools for future plant-microbe interaction studies, and in the development of new inoculant formulations for agriculture and biotechnology.

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2019-09-01
2020-11-28
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