1887

Abstract

Soil bacteria are generally capable of growth on a wide range of organic chemicals, and pseudomonads are particularly adept at utilizing aromatic compounds. Pseudomonads are motile bacteria that are capable of sensing a wide range of chemicals, using both energy taxis and chemotaxis. Whilst the identification of specific chemicals detected by the ≥26 chemoreceptors encoded in genomes is ongoing, the functions of only a limited number of chemoreceptors have been revealed to date. We report here that McpC, a methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein in F1 that was previously shown to function as a receptor for cytosine, was also responsible for the chemotactic response to the carboxylated pyridine nicotinic acid.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • National Science Foundation (Award MCB0919930)
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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/mic.0.081968-0
2014-12-01
2021-05-15
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