1887

Abstract

Although , the group B , is a leading cause of invasive neonatal disease worldwide the molecular basis of its virulence is still poorly understood. To investigate the role of lipoproteins in the physiology and interaction of this pathogen with host cells, we generated a mutant strain (A909ΔLgt) deficient in the Lgt enzyme and thus unable to lipidate lipoprotein precursors (pro-lipoproteins). The loss of pro-lipoprotein lipidation did not affect the viability of or its growth in several different media, including cation-depleted media. The processing of two well-characterized lipoproteins, but not a non-lipoprotein, was clearly shown to be aberrant in A909ΔLgt. The mutant strain was shown to be more sensitive to oxidative stress although the molecular basis of this increased sensitivity was not apparent. The inactivation of Lgt also resulted in changes to the bacterial cell envelope, as demonstrated by reduced retention of both the group B carbohydrate and the polysaccharide capsule and a statistically significant reduction (=0.0079) in A909ΔLgt adherence to human endothelial cells of fetal origin. These data confirm that failure to process lipoproteins correctly has pleiotropic effects that may be of significance to colonization and pathogenesis.

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2009-05-01
2019-08-24
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vol. , part 5, pp. 1451 - 1458

Strategy for generating allelic replacement mutants of A909 [ PDF] (24 kb)



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