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Abstract

Burn wound infection is the leading cause of mortality among burn wound patients. One of the most commonly isolated bacterial burn wound pathogens is , a notorious nosocomial multidrug-resistant pathogen. As a consequence of its recalcitrance to frontline antibiotic therapy, there is an urgent need to develop alternative treatment avenues to tackle this pathogen. One potential alternative infection prevention measure is to seed the wound bed with probiotic bacteria. Several species of a common commensal bacterium, have been previously reported to display growth inhibition activity against wound pathogens. Various species of this genus have also been shown to augment the wound healing process, which makes it a promising potential therapeutic agent. Due to the complexity of the burn wound trauma and burn wound infection, an model is required for the development of novel therapeutics. There are multiple models that are currently available, the most common among them being the murine model. However, mammalian burn wound infection models are logistically challenging, do not lend themselves to screening approaches and come with significant concerns around ethics and animal welfare. Recently, an invertebrate burn wound and infection model using has been established. This model addresses several of the challenges of more advanced animal models, such as affordability, maintenance and reduced ethical concerns. This study validates the capacity of this model to screen for potential wound probiotics by demonstrating that a variety of spp can limit burn wound infection and improve survival.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Academy of Medical Sciences (Award SBF006\1040)
    • Principle Award Recipient: RonanMcCarthy
  • Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (Award BB/V007823/1)
    • Principle Award Recipient: RonanMcCarthy
  • National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement and Reduction of Animals in Research (Award NC/V001582/1)
    • Principle Award Recipient: RonanMcCarthy
  • This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.
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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/mic.0.001350
2023-06-22
2024-04-17
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