1887

Abstract

species are the leading cause of bacterial diarrhoea worldwide and consumption of contaminated chicken meat is the most common route of infection. Chickens can be infected with multiple strains of and during the infection cycle this pathogen must survive a wide variety of environments. Numerous studies have reported a high degree of genetic variability in this pathogen that can use antigenic and phase variation to alter the expression of key phenotypes. In this study the phenotypic profile of isolates from freshly slaughtered chickens, chicken products in the supermarket and stool samples from infected patients were compared to identify phenotypic changes during the passage of the bacteria through the infection cycle. Isolates from different stages of the infection cycle had altered phenotypic profiles with isolates from human stool samples showing a lower ability to form a biofilm and an increased ability to associate with epithelial cells . Resistance to fluoroquinolones was found in all cohorts but at a much higher occurrence (94%) in isolates from supermarket chicken. Isolates displaying high levels of resistance to fluoroquinolones also were more likely to display a higher tolerance to growth in the presence of oxygen. In conclusion, isolates with specific phenotypes appear to be overly represented at different stages of the infection cycle suggesting that environmental stresses may be enriched for strains with these phenotypes.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Irish Research Council for Science, Engineering and Technology (Award GOIPG/2020/823)
    • Principle Award Recipient: GillianCarney
  • This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. This article was made open access via a Publish and Read agreement between the Microbiology Society and the corresponding author’s institution.
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2023-06-23
2024-06-21
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