1887

Abstract

Cachexia (CC) is a complex wasting syndrome that significantly affects life quality and life expectancy among cancer patients. Original studies, in which CC was induced in mouse models through inoculation with BaF and C26 tumour cells, demonstrated that CC development correlates with bacterial gut dysbiosis in these animals. In both cases, a common microbial signature was observed, based on the expansion of in the gut of CC animals. However, these two types of tumours induce unique microbial profiles, suggesting that different CC induction mechanisms significantly impact the outcome of gut dysbiosis. The present study sought to expand the scope of such analyses by characterizing the CC-associated dysbiosis that develops when mice are inoculated with Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells, which constitutes one of the most widely employed mechanisms for CC induction. Interestingly, expansion is also observed in LLC-induced CC. However, the dysbiosis identified herein displays a more complex pattern, involving representatives from seven different bacterial phyla, which were consistently identified across successive levels of taxonomic hierarchy. These results are supported by a predictive analysis of gene content, which identified a series of functional/structural changes that potentially occur in the gut bacterial population of these animals, providing a complementary and alternative approach to microbiome analyses based solely on taxonomic classification.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • fundação de amparo à pesquisa do estado de são paulo (Award #2017/13197-8)
    • Principle Award Recipient: LuizR Nunes
  • fundação de amparo à pesquisa do estado de são paulo (Award #2017/08112-3)
    • Principle Award Recipient: DanielaLeite Jabes
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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/mic.0.001088
2021-10-01
2021-10-24
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