1887

Abstract

The C5-dicarboxylate α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) is a preferred nutrient source for the opportunistic pathogen . However, very little is known about how detects and responds to α-KG in the environment. Our laboratory has previously shown that the MifS/MifR two-component signal transduction system regulates α-KG assimilation in PAO1. In an effort to better understand how this bacterium detects α-KG, we characterized the MifS sensor histidine kinase. In this study we show that although MifS is a homologue of the C4-dicarboxylate sensor DctB, it specifically responds to the C5-dicarboxylate α-KG. MifS activity increased >10-fold in the presence of α-KG, while the related C5-dicarboxylate glutarate caused only a 2-fold increase in activity. All other dicarboxylates tested did not show any significant effect on MifS activity. Homology modelling of the MifS sensor domain revealed a substrate binding pocket for α-KG. Using protein modelling and mutational analysis, we identified nine residues that are important for α-KG response, including one residue that determines the substrate specificity of MifS. Further, we found that MifS has a novel cytoplasmic linker domain that is required for α-KG response and is probably involved in signal transduction from the sensor domain to the cytoplasmic transmitter domain. Until this study, DctB family histidine kinases were known to only respond to C4-dicarboxylates. Our work shows that MifS is a novel member of the DctB family histidine kinase that specifically responds to α-KG.

Funding
This study was supported by the:
  • Christopher T. Nomura , National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases , (Award R15GM104880-03)
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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/mic.0.000943
2020-06-17
2020-10-20
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