1887

Abstract

Chemolithotrophic sulfur oxidation represents a significant part of the biogeochemical cycling of this element. Due to its long evolutionary history, this ancient metabolism is well known for its extensive mechanistic and phylogenetic diversification across a diverse taxonomic spectrum. Here we carried out whole-genome sequencing and analysis of a new betaproteobacterial isolate, SBSA, which is found to oxidize thiosulfate via the formation of tetrathionate as an intermediate. The 4.7 Mb SBSA genome was found to encompass a operon, plus single thiosulfate dehydrogenase () and sulfite : acceptor oxidoreductase () genes. Recombination-based knockout of revealed that the entire thiosulfate is first converted to tetrathionate by the activity of thiosulfate dehydrogenase (TsdA) and the Sox pathway is not functional in this bacterium despite the presence of all necessary genes. The ∆ and ∆ knockout mutants exhibited a wild-type-like phenotype for thiosulfate/tetrathionate oxidation, whereas ∆ and ::Kan mutants only oxidized thiosulfate up to tetrathionate intermediate and had complete impairment in tetrathionate oxidation. The substrate-dependent O consumption rate of whole cells and the sulfur-oxidizing enzyme activities of cell-free extracts, measured in the presence/absence of thiol inhibitors/glutathione, indicated that glutathione plays a key role in SBSA tetrathionate oxidation. The present findings collectively indicate that the potential glutathione : tetrathionate coupling in involves a novel enzymatic component, which is different from the dual-functional thiol dehydrotransferase (ThdT), while subsequent oxidation of the sulfur intermediates produced (e.g. glutathione : sulfodisulfane molecules) may proceed via the iterative action of .

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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/mic.0.000890
2020-01-30
2020-02-28
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