1887

Abstract

strain CIAT 899 possesses outstanding agronomic properties as it displays tolerance to environmental stresses, a broad host range and high effectiveness in fixing nitrogen with the common bean ( L.); in addition, it carries intriguing features such as five copies of the regulatory gene, and the capacity to synthesize a variety of nodulation factors (NFs), even in a flavonoid-independent manner, when submitted to abiotic stresses. However, the roles of several genes of the repertoire of CIAT 899 remain to be determined. In this study, we obtained mutants for the , and genes of CIAT 899 and investigated their expression, NF structures and symbiotic properties. Either in the presence of the flavonoid apigenin, or of salt the expression of , and in wild-type CIAT 899 was highly up-regulated in comparison to the mutants of all five copies of , indicating the roles that regulatory genes play in the activation of , and ; however, NodD1 was recognized as the main inducer. In total, 29 different NF structures were synthesized by wild-type CIAT 899 induced by apigenin, and 36 when induced by salt, being drastically reduced by mutations in , and , especially under osmotic stress, with specific changes related to each gene, indicating that the three genes participate in the synthesis of NFs. Mutations in , and affected differently symbiotic performance (nodule number and shoot dry weight), according to the host plant. Our results indicate that the expression of , and genes of CIAT 899 is mediated by genes, and although these three genes do not belong to the main set of genes controlling nodulation, they contribute to the synthesis of NFs that will impact symbiotic performance and host specificity.

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/content/journal/micro/10.1099/mic.0.000824
2019-09-01
2019-09-24
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