1887

Abstract

Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats, associated proteins (CRISPR/Cas), has been developed into a powerful, targeted genome-editing tool in a wide variety of species. Here, we report an extensive investigation of the type II CRISPR/Cas9 system for targeted gene editing in Streptomyces rimosus. S. rimosus is used in the production of the antibiotic oxytetracycline, and its genome differs greatly from other species of the genus Streptomyces in the conserved chromosome terminal and core regions, which is of major production and scientific research value. The genes zwf2 and devB were chosen as target genes, and were edited separately via single-site mutations, double-site mutations and gene fragment disruptions. The single-site mutation guided by sgRNA-1 or sgRNA-2, respectively, involved GG changing to CA, GC changing to AT, and GG changing to CC. The double-site mutations guided by sgRNA-1 and sgRNA-2 included deletions and/or point mutations. Consistently, all mutations occurred in the gRNA sequence regions. Deletion mutations were characterized by the absence of eight bases, including three bases upstream of the PAM (protospacer adjacent motif) sequence, the PAM sequence itself and two bases downstream of the PAM sequence. A mutant (zwf2 devB ) with a high yield of oxytetracycline was successfully obtained, whose oxytetracycline level was increased by 36.8 % compared to the original strain. These results confirm that CRISPR/Cas9 can successfully serve as a useful targeted genome editing system in S. rimosus.

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2017-07-18
2019-10-17
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